Category: Ireland News

1 Song for Equality and Peace by Craymo

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3JHZ23suKo">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3JHZ23suKo</a>
(GayWebSource.com) Orlando, FL 1/1/2017

Indie gay Orlando singer/songwriter Craymo releases an inspirational new music video for the re-release single of his reggae pop song One Love One World (We Are One). One Love One World is a heartfelt song promoting world peace, equality, love, tolerance, brotherhood and human rights.

With all of the recent incidents of terrorism, mass shootings and senseless killing of innocent people and children, Craymo wants to start 2016 with a message and vision of love for the world. The music video begins with children in Pang Liu Village in China who were taught English using One Love One World as a learning aid.

It is a thought provoking message of the power of a song to change people’s lives for the better. Craymo says “let’s all put our hands together to help make this world a better place for all of us.”

The music video is co-directed by Craymo along with Nathan McMahan of August Moon Productions. The Director of Photography is Brent Reynolds, also of August Moon Productions and was edited by Jason Barnes, all local central Florida film talents. One Love One World (We Are One) is co-written by Craig Stephen Raymo and Brandon Jarrett of Moho Productions. The song is produced by Brandon Jarrett.

One Love One World (We Are One) world premiere music video is released January 1, 2016 on YouTube and all social media.

One Love One World is from Craymo’s CD Cosmos available on iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/one-love-one-world/id580366397?i=580366635

and CDBaby.com

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

Transgender

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

The post appeared first on Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far .

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

This post appeared first on MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk - Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far .

MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk are covering Ireland, UK and rest of the world with LGBT news for the LGBT community and their family and friends.

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

The post appeared first on Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far .

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

The post appeared first on Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far .

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

Transgender

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far

At Committee Stage, Senators have an opportunity to offer amendments to the current Bill. They also have the opportunity to raise issues with the Bill in more detail.

It has been an interesting debate so far, as Senators from across the house have almost unanimously raised the same three problems:

1) ‘Forced divorce': The single criteria, which demands that applicants be single if they are to apply for recognition, forces married trans people to choose between their family and their identity.

2) Restrictive medical requirements: This criteria sets out that a person must have their ‘primary treating medical practitioner’ (defined only as a psychiatrist or endocrinologist) confirm their identity in order to be legally recognised – pathologisation by any other name.

3) Exclusion of young people: The age criteria refuses legal recognition to trans and intersex persons under the age of 16, and places an onerous pathway for recognition on 16 and 17 year olds.

Recognition: Trans people must be at the centre of this debate

Another issue raised unanimously during the Second Stage debates, was the need to place trans people at the centre of the debate on gender recognition.

One Labour Senator, Marie Moloney, said, ‘It is crucial [Trans] voices are listened to’, while her Fine Gael colleague, Cáit Keane, stated, ‘Who better than the people themselves to educate us’. Gerard Craughwell, Independent Senator, in an impassioned speech said, ‘None of us can know what trans people go through’. And Fianna Fáil’s, Paschal Mooney, reiterated this point while stressing that, ‘We need to get it right, in the interests of the very people it is directed towards.’

This cross party consensus on the necessity to listen to trans people, and to ensure that they were at the centre of the legislation, was incredibly powerful during the debates. On a number of occasions, the words of trans people were read into the public record. This was particularly powerful as the words of Sam Blanckensee were read by one Senator:

“In the eyes of the State, the man I have become does not exist”

To mark the introduction of the Gender Recognition Bill in the Seanad, TENI launched a video called ‘Gender Recognition Matters’. This aimed to ensure the voices of trans people were heard in this debate. In less than two weeks, the video has been viewed almost 8,000 times.

Watch ‘Gender Recognition Matters’

Gender Recognition Bill 2014: Committee Stage Debate

All of these issues will now be dealt with in far more detail during the Committee Stage debate. Considering the overwhelming consensus to both the problems with the current Bill, and the necessity to listen to trans people, the Goverment will now have an opportunity to amend the Bill so that it more appropriately reflects and protects the people at whom it is aimed.

The debate will begin tomorrow, Tuesday 3rd February, at 4.45pm, and you can watch it online using the link here.

The post appeared first on MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk - Gender Recognition: The Irish Debate So Far .

Ireland : Gender Recognition Bill published, falls short of meeting the needs of Trans young people

The Bill introduces a mechanism whereby young people aged 16 and 17 can obtain a Gender Recognition Certificate. While the inclusion of under 18’s within the bill represents some progress, the process they would have to follow is, BeLonG To believes, too arduous, impartical and unfair on young people.

The process for 16 and 17 year olds will require parental consent, a court order, a letter from a primary treating medical practitioner and a concurring opinion from an independent endocrinologist or psychiatrist.

Speaking today, David Carroll, Executive Director with BeLonG To said “We acknowledge the inclusion of Trans young people in the bill however, we are concerned that young people without parental consent will not have access to a Gender Recognition Certificate under the current proposals. The four-fold requirement for parental consent, a court order and two medical letters is unneccessarily arduous on young people who are often at an extremely vulnerable and stressful moment in the lives. These requirements reinforce exclusion and will not contribute to descreasing marginalisation and isolation amongst Trans young people.”

IndividualiTy, a weekly peer support group for Trans identified young people aged 14 – 23 is one of BeLonG To’s core groups, and has experienced a huge rise in attendance in recent years with an ever reducing age of young people reaching out for support.

Mr. Carroll continued, ” Often parents contact us seeking support for their Trans children and despite their best efforts, families all too often report feeling isolated, frustrated and left extremely vulnerable’

While the introduction of this Bill is another step forward in creating a Trans inclusive legal framework it falls far short of meeting needs of Trans young people. As it stands the Bill is also out of synch with Advice from the Ombudsman for Children’s Office on the General Scheme of the Gender Recognition Bill 2013.

We are committed to advancing the rights of Trans young people as the Bill moves through the legislative process.

The post appeared first on Ireland : Gender Recognition Bill published, falls short of meeting the needs of Trans young people .

Ireland : Gender Recognition Bill published, falls short of meeting the needs of Trans young people

The Bill introduces a mechanism whereby young people aged 16 and 17 can obtain a Gender Recognition Certificate. While the inclusion of under 18’s within the bill represents some progress, the process they would have to follow is, BeLonG To believes, too arduous, impartical and unfair on young people.

The process for 16 and 17 year olds will require parental consent, a court order, a letter from a primary treating medical practitioner and a concurring opinion from an independent endocrinologist or psychiatrist.

Speaking today, David Carroll, Executive Director with BeLonG To said “We acknowledge the inclusion of Trans young people in the bill however, we are concerned that young people without parental consent will not have access to a Gender Recognition Certificate under the current proposals. The four-fold requirement for parental consent, a court order and two medical letters is unneccessarily arduous on young people who are often at an extremely vulnerable and stressful moment in the lives. These requirements reinforce exclusion and will not contribute to descreasing marginalisation and isolation amongst Trans young people.”

IndividualiTy, a weekly peer support group for Trans identified young people aged 14 – 23 is one of BeLonG To’s core groups, and has experienced a huge rise in attendance in recent years with an ever reducing age of young people reaching out for support.

Mr. Carroll continued, ” Often parents contact us seeking support for their Trans children and despite their best efforts, families all too often report feeling isolated, frustrated and left extremely vulnerable’

While the introduction of this Bill is another step forward in creating a Trans inclusive legal framework it falls far short of meeting needs of Trans young people. As it stands the Bill is also out of synch with Advice from the Ombudsman for Children’s Office on the General Scheme of the Gender Recognition Bill 2013.

We are committed to advancing the rights of Trans young people as the Bill moves through the legislative process.

This post appeared first on MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk - Ireland : Gender Recognition Bill published, falls short of meeting the needs of Trans young people .

MySoCalledGayLife.co.uk are covering Ireland, UK and rest of the world with LGBT news for the LGBT community and their family and friends.

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