Month: May 2014

Sales Executive EnGAYged Weddings

New Port Richey, FL 34653

Sales Executive EnGAYged Weddings

Gay Weddings are a Multi-Billion Dollar industry!

Our company is growing faster than we can keep up with.​

Sales Executive EnGAYged Weddings

We are the largest LGBT Wedding Directory in the World, with clients in the U.​S.​, Canada, Mexico, Central & South America, the U.​K.​ and we expanding throughout Europe, Australia, & New Zealand.​
We also have the highest ranking LGBT Wedding Directory on Google 98%​ of all our Keywords are # 1 on Google.​
We need experienced Sales Executives to handle new accounts.​
  • You will be given all the tools to become successful, our Sales Executives work from home (After Training) and average about $1,500.​00 a week.​
  • You will be supplied with sales leads as well as potential new Client lists.​ We also use SalesForce Software to track all your Prospects.​
In addition we are also looking for qualified Data Entry & Computer Programming personnel as well.​
At EnGAYged Weddings, you will find wedding professionals that are proud to provide wedding services and support to Gay, Lesbian, Bi-Sexual, and Transgender couples. Unlike the other directories – we do not have an automated on-line sign-up process for gay wedding advertising. Every wedding vendor on this website has been personally interviewed by the owners of EnGAYged Weddings, and each wedding business is guaranteed to be either LGBT friendly, operated or owned.

Plan Your Same-Sex Marriage Ceremony, Civil Union or Commitment Ceremony with EnGAYged Weddings!

EnGAYged Weddings is the ONLY on-line directory for gay wedding advertising that gets to know it’s wedding vendors before they are listed. This is the largest verified gay wedding planning directory for Lesbian and Gay Weddings, Commitment Ceremonies, Civil Union Ceremonies, Holy Unions, Domestic Partnerships, and Reciprocal Beneficiary Rights on the internet. Finally! A Lesbian and Gay Wedding Directory that provides you with all the sophistication, class, and respect that you both deserve – where our community of partners and wedding vendors will help empower you to turn your dream wedding, commitment ceremony, or destination wedding into a reality!

The EnGAYged Weddings On-Line Community

We are all here to help you with every important detail concerning your special day. We are committed to making your day just as perfect and wonderful as the two of you are. You’ve both been dreaming about your wedding day forever. Your day is finally here! On EnGAYged Weddings, you will find a welcoming community of gay couples, gay friendly wedding vendors and gay owned wedding businesses. You’ll be able to share your EnGAYgement story, and wedding planning ideas with other newly EnGAYged couples and professional wedding vendors!

Our Goal Is Globally Recognized Marriage Equality

States all over the country are finally waking up from the dark ages and ensuring that marriage and all of it’s legal guarantees are equal rights enjoyed by all. Just in the last two years, over 10 states have legalized some form of Same-Sex Marriage. We hope that over the next year we will see even more states provide equal rights and opportunities for all couples who truly love one another and are ready to say “I Do” for the long haul!

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CASTING CALL: Gay Guys And Dating Apps

Would you like to take part in Channel 4 documentary about gay dating apps?

by Newsdesk | 31st May 2014

Factory Films are making a short online documentary for Channel 4, presented by Harry Hitchens, about the world of gay dating apps such as Grindr, Scruff, VGL etc.

Whether you use them, refuse to use them, have stopped after a bad experience, or haven’t used them before but maybe want to start, we’d love to hear from you. You need to be 16+, live in the UK and be happy to potentially talk to Harry on camera.

If you’re interested email researcher@factoryfilms.tv with your name, age and a brief summary of your situation. Please don’t send any attachments, photos or videos.

All correspondence will be kept in accordance with Factory Film’s data protection policy: http://www.factoryfilms.tv/data-protection-policy/

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PROFILE: Gay Men’s Heath Crisis

Via Wikipedia:

The GMHC (formerly Gay Men's Health Crisis) is a New York City–based non-profit, volunteer-supported and community-based AIDS service organization that has led the United States in the fight against AIDS.

The organization was founded in January 1982 after reports began surfacing in San Francisco and New York City that a rare form of cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma was affecting young gay men.[1]

After the Centers for Disease Control declared the new disease an epidemic, Gay Men's Health Crisis was created when 80 men gathered in New York writer Larry Kramer's apartment to discuss the issue of "gay cancer" and to raise money for research. GMHC took its name from the fact that the earliest men who fell victim to AIDS in the early 1980s were gay.

The founders were Nathan Fain, Larry Kramer, Lawrence D. Mass, Paul Popham, Paul Rapoport and Edmund White. They organized the formal, tax-exempt entity. At the time it was the largest volunteer AIDS organization in the world. Paul Popham was chosen as the president.

Rodger McFarlane began a crisis counseling hotline that originated on his own home telephone, which ultimately became one of the organization's most effective tools for sharing information about AIDS. He was named as the director of GHMC in 1982, helping create a more formal structure for the nascent organization, which had no funding or offices when he took on the role. GMHC operated out of a couple of rooms for offices in a rooming house in Chelsea owned by Mel Cheren of West End Records.[citation needed]

Larry Kramer wrote that by the time of McFarlane's death, "the G.M.H.C. is essentially what he started: crisis counseling, legal aid, volunteers, the buddy system, social workers" as part of an organization that serves more than 15,000 people affected by HIV and AIDS. In an interview with The New York Times after McFarlane's death in May 2009, Kramer described how "single-handedly Rodger took this struggling ragtag group of really frightened and mostly young men, found us an office and set up all the programs."[2]

Kramer resigned in 1983 to form the more militant ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) as a more political alternative. From that time on his public comments and posture toward GMHC were negative, if not hostile. Kramer's play The Normal Heart is a roman à clef of his involvement with the organization.

On April 30, 1983, the GMHC sponsored the first major fund-raising event for AIDS – a benefit performance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.[3]

By 1984, the Centers for Disease Control had requested GMHC's assistance in planning public conferences on AIDS. That same year, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus was discovered by the French Dr. Luc Montagnier. Within two years, GMHC was assisting heterosexual men and women, hemophiliacs, intravenous drug users, and children.

Gay Men's Health Crisis received extensive coverage in Randy Shilts' 1987 book And the Band Played On. The book described the progress of the pandemic blaming the government, especially the Reagan administration and Secretary of Health Margaret Heckler, for failing to respond. It praised GMHC for its work. Shilts was a gay man who later died of AIDS.[4]

1990s

In 1997 the organization moved into headquarters at the nine-story Tisch Building at 119 West 24 Street in the Chelsea neighborhood. The building underwent a $12.5 Million renovation. It is named for Preston Robert Tisch and Joan Tisch. The couple donated $3.5 million for the project and Joan is on the GMHC board of directors.[5]

In the 1990s a fundraising event on the Atlantic Ocean beach at Fire Island Pines, New York evolved into a major Circuit Party and developed a reputation for being connected with unsafe sex and recreational drug use. GMHC pulled the plug after the 1998 fundraiser after one man died on Fire Island of an overdose of the drug gamma hydroxy butyrate (GHB) the evening before the party and 21 revelers were arrested for drug possession.[6][dead link]

2000s

GMHC has received multiple grants from the Carnegie Corporation, an organization that has supported more than 550 New York City arts and social service institutions since its inception in 2002, and which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg[7] (along with 406 other arts and social service institutions).

Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) has moved to a new and expanded home consisting of 165,000 square feet (15,300 m2) of redesigned and renovated space at 446 West 33rd Street in Manhattan. GMHC is expanding its wide range of services for over 100,000 New Yorkers affected by HIV/AIDS.[8] These services include health and nutrition education, legal, housing and mental health support, vocational training and case management. With a new state-of-the-art kitchen and larger dining room, free hot meals will be served to more clients. The Keith Haring Food Pantry Program will increase its capacity to provide grocery bags and nutrition counseling to more people in need.

The new location has enabled GMHC to expand its services to meet the growing and complex needs of people affected by HIV/AIDS. In this 30th year of the epidemic, HIV continues to rise at alarming rates – locally and nationally – particularly among women, African Americans, Latinos and men who have sex with men.[9]

The HIV prevention and testing programs are being expanded in the new GMHC Center for HIV Prevention at 224 West 29th Street in NYC which will include a new youth leadership-development program. The new Center for HIV Prevention opened May 31.

References

"Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals". New York Times. July 3, 1981.

Hevesi, Dennis. "Rodger McFarlane, Who Led AIDS-Related Groups, Dies at 54", The New York Times, May 18, 2009. Accessed May 19, 2009.

http://www.aegis.com/news/lt/1994/lt940208.html

Building Blocks In the Battle On AIDS – New York Times – March 30, 1997

Roberts, Sam (July 6, 2005). "City Groups Get Bloomberg Gift of $20 Million". New York Times. Retrieved May 3, 2010.

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene HIV/AIDS Information

Center for Disease Control Factsheet "HIV in the United States"

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

PROFILE: Gay Men’s Heath Crisis

Via Wikipedia:

The GMHC (formerly Gay Men's Health Crisis) is a New York City–based non-profit, volunteer-supported and community-based AIDS service organization that has led the United States in the fight against AIDS.

The organization was founded in January 1982 after reports began surfacing in San Francisco and New York City that a rare form of cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma was affecting young gay men.[1]

After the Centers for Disease Control declared the new disease an epidemic, Gay Men's Health Crisis was created when 80 men gathered in New York writer Larry Kramer's apartment to discuss the issue of "gay cancer" and to raise money for research. GMHC took its name from the fact that the earliest men who fell victim to AIDS in the early 1980s were gay.

The founders were Nathan Fain, Larry Kramer, Lawrence D. Mass, Paul Popham, Paul Rapoport and Edmund White. They organized the formal, tax-exempt entity. At the time it was the largest volunteer AIDS organization in the world. Paul Popham was chosen as the president.

Rodger McFarlane began a crisis counseling hotline that originated on his own home telephone, which ultimately became one of the organization's most effective tools for sharing information about AIDS. He was named as the director of GHMC in 1982, helping create a more formal structure for the nascent organization, which had no funding or offices when he took on the role. GMHC operated out of a couple of rooms for offices in a rooming house in Chelsea owned by Mel Cheren of West End Records.[citation needed]

Larry Kramer wrote that by the time of McFarlane's death, "the G.M.H.C. is essentially what he started: crisis counseling, legal aid, volunteers, the buddy system, social workers" as part of an organization that serves more than 15,000 people affected by HIV and AIDS. In an interview with The New York Times after McFarlane's death in May 2009, Kramer described how "single-handedly Rodger took this struggling ragtag group of really frightened and mostly young men, found us an office and set up all the programs."[2]

Kramer resigned in 1983 to form the more militant ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) as a more political alternative. From that time on his public comments and posture toward GMHC were negative, if not hostile. Kramer's play The Normal Heart is a roman à clef of his involvement with the organization.

On April 30, 1983, the GMHC sponsored the first major fund-raising event for AIDS – a benefit performance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus.[3]

By 1984, the Centers for Disease Control had requested GMHC's assistance in planning public conferences on AIDS. That same year, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus was discovered by the French Dr. Luc Montagnier. Within two years, GMHC was assisting heterosexual men and women, hemophiliacs, intravenous drug users, and children.

Gay Men's Health Crisis received extensive coverage in Randy Shilts' 1987 book And the Band Played On. The book described the progress of the pandemic blaming the government, especially the Reagan administration and Secretary of Health Margaret Heckler, for failing to respond. It praised GMHC for its work. Shilts was a gay man who later died of AIDS.[4]

1990s

In 1997 the organization moved into headquarters at the nine-story Tisch Building at 119 West 24 Street in the Chelsea neighborhood. The building underwent a $12.5 Million renovation. It is named for Preston Robert Tisch and Joan Tisch. The couple donated $3.5 million for the project and Joan is on the GMHC board of directors.[5]

In the 1990s a fundraising event on the Atlantic Ocean beach at Fire Island Pines, New York evolved into a major Circuit Party and developed a reputation for being connected with unsafe sex and recreational drug use. GMHC pulled the plug after the 1998 fundraiser after one man died on Fire Island of an overdose of the drug gamma hydroxy butyrate (GHB) the evening before the party and 21 revelers were arrested for drug possession.[6][dead link]

2000s

GMHC has received multiple grants from the Carnegie Corporation, an organization that has supported more than 550 New York City arts and social service institutions since its inception in 2002, and which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg[7] (along with 406 other arts and social service institutions).

Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC) has moved to a new and expanded home consisting of 165,000 square feet (15,300 m2) of redesigned and renovated space at 446 West 33rd Street in Manhattan. GMHC is expanding its wide range of services for over 100,000 New Yorkers affected by HIV/AIDS.[8] These services include health and nutrition education, legal, housing and mental health support, vocational training and case management. With a new state-of-the-art kitchen and larger dining room, free hot meals will be served to more clients. The Keith Haring Food Pantry Program will increase its capacity to provide grocery bags and nutrition counseling to more people in need.

The new location has enabled GMHC to expand its services to meet the growing and complex needs of people affected by HIV/AIDS. In this 30th year of the epidemic, HIV continues to rise at alarming rates – locally and nationally – particularly among women, African Americans, Latinos and men who have sex with men.[9]

The HIV prevention and testing programs are being expanded in the new GMHC Center for HIV Prevention at 224 West 29th Street in NYC which will include a new youth leadership-development program. The new Center for HIV Prevention opened May 31.

References

"Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals". New York Times. July 3, 1981.

Hevesi, Dennis. "Rodger McFarlane, Who Led AIDS-Related Groups, Dies at 54", The New York Times, May 18, 2009. Accessed May 19, 2009.

http://www.aegis.com/news/lt/1994/lt940208.html

Building Blocks In the Battle On AIDS – New York Times – March 30, 1997

Roberts, Sam (July 6, 2005). "City Groups Get Bloomberg Gift of $20 Million". New York Times. Retrieved May 3, 2010.

NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene HIV/AIDS Information

Center for Disease Control Factsheet "HIV in the United States"

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

REVIEW: The Normal Heart

Larry Kramer is perpetually angry. This prominent loud-mouthed writer and gay activist has been shouting out his highly personal take on some of life's iniquities and in-equalities for the past 40 years and has made himself famously unpopular.

by Roger Walker-Dack | 31st May 2014

★★★★★

It was his exasperation with the apathy of the gay community when the AIDS scare first started that made him co-found the Gay Mens Health Crisis in his living room in 1981. And it was his unfettered bursts of outrage against an indifferent and immovable culture and a bureaucratic stonewall that got him unceremoniously forced out of the Organisation just two years later.

Retiring to Europe to lick his wounds, Kramer sat down and wrote an autobiographical piece of his whole experience of those past constantly changing years. It opened Off Broadway in 1985 when the AIDS Epidemic had really started to take a tight grip in New York (and many other major cities) and 'The Normal Heart' became the seminal play of the period. It would be another 6 years before Kushner's 'Angels of America' would be seen.

Now nearly some three decades later the play finally makes it to the silver screen after many false starts and broken promises, but along the way it has not lost a single iota of its potency with its powerful story that never fails to stun its audience into sheer silence.

The movie opens on a typical care-free speedo-clad beach in Fire Island summer in the late 1970's where sex is the first and second thing on the minds on this happy gay crowd. When one of their number suddenly collapses without warning on the sand no-one has the slightest idea that he is one of the early victims of what the New York Times will later describe as GRID (Gay Related Immune Deficiency) i.e. the Gay Cancer.

As the virus spreads writer Ned Weeks played by Mark Ruffalo (Kramer's 'stand in') tracks down Dr Emma Brockner (Julia Roberts) who is the first physician in NY dealing solely with the epidemic and she simply cannot cope. She is overwhelmed with the increasing number of patients, with the indifference of the medical community who in denial, refuse to help or provide funds; and the apathy of the gay community who refuse to give up their newly gained hedonistic liberty to stop having sex just because this disabled doctor says it could kill them.

Brockner recognizes a passionate true spirit in Weeks and eggs him to start trying to both persuade the gay community to change their practices and also organize an official support system.

Even with the figures of gay men getting sick and dying escalating at an unprecedented pace Weeks is frustrated at the very little headway the newly formed GMHC is making. Finding himself as the unofficial spokesman, mainly due to the fact that he is not only the most articulate of the bunch, but his anger at a system that refuses to pitch in and help makes him a compelling anti-Establishment figure that the media are happy to cover.

It may help them sell newspapers but it doesn't achieve any of Week's more lofty ambitions, and in fact only serves as the reason for the Board of GMHC to fight him tooth and nail and try and control his activities. Even with a Mayor, a President and a whole medical community that refuses to do anything to help stop all these men dying, the GMHC still wants to take a very cautious and overly polite approach so as not to upset either anyone in power or a gay community that do not want to curb their lifestyles.

Whilst all this is going down 30-something-year-old Weeks finds love for the first time in his life in the shape of a younger New York Times Reporter Felix Turner (Matt Bomer). This unlikely seeming couple turn out to be a perfect match and their very passionate relationship is the one happy part of Week's life even though it is sadly doomed when Turner falls ill and his young life is unseemly ended way before its prime like so many others of his generation.

The movie ends soon after that (although the story in real life didn't with Kramer going on to co-found ACT UP the AIDS activist organisation that unapologetically demanded help and support to help fight the plague and whose many successes included the releasing of much needed drugs and funds).

Kramer's anger may also have been one of the reasons that it took so long to get this on to our screens, but it was worth every minute of the wait. In Ryan Murphy, the openly gay creator of 'Glee' and 'American Horror Story', he found a filmmaker who not only put his own money where his mouth was by buying the Rights himself, but he proved to be a collaborator who created a masterpiece movie true to his vision.

Murphy deserves credit for many things, not least the fact that he took the almost unheard of decision of casting many openly gay actors to play gay men. With not one mis-step in his selection which included the actor & director Joe Mantello as Mickey Marcus (fresh from his Tony nominated turn playing Ned Weeks in the recent Broadway revival); Jim Parsons repeating his role in the same production as Tommy Boatwright; Jonathan Groff, Taylor Kitsch, Alfred Molina, Frank De Julio, and the ultra handsome Matt Bomer as Tyler who quietly shed 40 lbs to play his dying character without any of the inflated brouhaha of a certain Oscar Winner who had trouble mentioning the word AIDS in public!

Mark Ruffalo gets nominated as an honorary gay for his convincing portrayal of Ned Weeks who was equally passionate berating politicians as he was making love to his boyfriend. And last, but not least, Julia Roberts very competently played the part that Barbra Streisand had lusted after years, the physician who was sadly dabbed as Dr Death.

With Murphy refusing to shy away from any of Kramer's rhetoric or the scary visuals of the violent and cruel deaths these young men suffered, this is the story of how it really happened, warts and all. There are no flowery allegories or sightings of Angels as in the Kushner play but just sheer unadulterated screaming and angry rants at a world that we thought may actually kill us all

If you were around at any of these times from the early 1980's on, then this powerful heart-wrenching piece will make a lot of unpleasant memories flood back. It is shockingly disturbing and serves to remind one that the nightmares that we lived through were not imagined in the slightest and were very real indeed.

If it hadn't been for Larry Kramer's loud mouth, it would been a whole lot worse. If on the other hand you are approaching this drama having been born after these events then I can only assume that this near apocalyptical scenario may even appear like an historical event that is nothing to do with you. Trust me it does. AIDS may longer be considered a gay plague, but as the closing credits of this movie remind us all too clearly, even now 6000 people are diagnosed with HIV every single day to increase the present world total of 35 million infected. It still affects as us.

P.S. The last word goes to Murphy when he simply summed it up after this movie was Premiered in NY. with 'You were right Larry'. I never thought otherwise.

The Normal Heart airs on 1st June on Sky Atlantic

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Britain’s Got Talent – La Voix and the London Gay Big Band

"It's been such a rollercoaster of a ride. We've played for large crowds before, but performing in a TV studio - with the cameras, the lights, the sets - is another thing altogether; an incredible experience. Very exciting!" (Kate Coole, Trumpet)

by Matt Peake | 29th May 2014

La Voix & London Gay Big Band - Mark Storey

A few weeks ago on Britain’s Got Talent, we saw La Voix aka vocalist, Chris Dennis, give a spectacular performance of Frank Sinatra’s classic New York, New York accompanied by an impressive jazz orchestra known as the London Gay Big Band. The band consists of five saxophones, four trombones, five trumpets, a keyboard, bass, guitar and drums. The band is claimed to be the only LGBT Big Band in the whole of the UK.

The judging panel that include Amanda Holden, Alesha Dixon and David Walliams loved the group claiming that “That’s how you make an impact! You’re a force to be reckoned with.”

Luckily Simon was not there to judge. Simon is notoriously not a big fan of drag acts and detests it if they win a spot in the live semi finals. However he was otherwise engaged as his partner, Lauren Silverman, went into labour with their son Eric.

Fortunately David was on hand to provide support for the group exclaiming 'I know Simon loves drag acts so I’m saying, yes for Simon, yes for me.'

BGT ITV La Voix Audition

The group’s leader Stefan had this to say,

'When we founded the London Gay Big Band three years ago in a damp and dingy basement of a London bookshop, we could never have dreamt of the amazing journey that we have been on, culminating in our upcoming Semi Final performance this week on the World's most prominent Talent show and a global stage!

We take our responsibility very seriously, proving that the gay scene is so much more than many of those pre-conceived stereotypes that are so often still prevalent amongst society. Our Band is all about making music, creating a community spirit by supporting each other and breaking boundaries. It’s about bringing something fresh, new and exciting to the LGBT scene and beyond.

So if there's one thing you do this week - watch Britain's Got Talent, and make your vote count! Let's show our nation the true diversity, variety and spirit of the LGBT community.'

Vince Walsh, one of the band’s trumpet players adds that “People forget that Big Band and Jazz music are about fun and emotion. Well, we’re here to remind you”.

For the audition clip please see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ce-ih4SSUQ0

For more info about the band please see www.londongaybigband.com

Don’t forget to show your love and support through Facebook and Twitter!

@LGBigBand and @lavoixtheshow

Watch the LIVE SEMI FINAL PERFORMANCE - SATURDAY 31 May 2014 at 7pm on ITV

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