Day: May 30, 2013

Seattle PrideFest 2013

June 30, 2013

Seattle, WA

Seattle PrideFest

PrideFest 2012 broke all attendance records! Planning for our 7th Annual event is already underway, and you can be sure that PrideFest 2013 will be bigger than ever, with 4-5 stages, even bigger talent, and longer hours. It’s the biggest free Pride Festival in the country, and it just keeps getting larger! Join us the last weekend of June for PrideFest at the Seattle Center. See you then!

Seattle PrideFest is the largest free Pride Festival in the country. The next PrideFest is June 30, 2013 at the Seattle Center!
To honor the past, celebrate Pride in the present, and help prepare for the battles our community will have to fight in the future. We raise money for community non-profits and help feature them at the festival in unique ways to enable them to better do the work they do in the community.

PrideFest is largest free pride festival in the United States, featuring 4 stages, world-class entertainment, measurable action and advocacy for the LGBT community, and tens of thousands of annual attendees. Find us at the Seattle Center the last weekend of June every year to celebrate LGBT Pride. Seattle PrideFest is run by One Degree Events, who has operated the festival since 2007.

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Seattle Pride 2013

June 29, 2013

Seattle, WA

Seattle Pride Parade

Our largest event is the Seattle Pride Parade. This parade is always a climax of the celebratory weekend on the last Sunday in June. Historically honors Stonewall – marking the start of the gay rights movement in 1969. Over 120 parade entries from different organizations, employers, sponsors and movements participate in this event. This event brings public awareness to current issues while also providing and advertising resources that support diversity, equal rights and community.

On Sunday, June 30, 2013, Seattle Pride will host its 39th annual Pride Parade starting at 11:00 AM. The parade kicks off at 4th Avenue & Union streets, and will proceed north down 4th Avenue to Denny Way. It will last approximately two and a half hours and will be held rain or shine.

For parade contingents, it should take about an hour to travel the distance. The parade will end at 2nd and Denny Way near Seattle Center. Once contingents complete the parade route, foot traffic will proceed north on 2nd Avenue. All vehicle traffic will continue west along Denny Way to Warren, where drivers will secure their vehicles, and leave the area. Parade volunteers stationed at the intersection of Denny Way and 2nd Avenue will help assure the safe and orderly flow of the parade participants out of the area. Pedestrians crossing at Denny Way is restricted to the east side of 4th Avenue.

The Parade announcers’ booth and media viewing area will be located at Westlake Park on 4th Avenue between Pike and Pine streets. Seattle Out & Proud asks that all those attending the parade watch from the sidewalks, to leave the street open for contingents.

ADA viewing areas are available at Westlake Plaza and on the east side of 4th Avenue and Bell Streets. ASL Interpreters will be available at both Westlake Park Announcer Stage and 4th and Bell Street Announcer Stage. No parking will be permitted in any area along the parade route and all vehicles must be registered, display an Event Pass and have a driver in the vehicle at all times. Unattended vehicles will be towed at the owner’s expense.

There are five intersections along the route that Metro buses will periodically cross the parade route. Seattle Police and Seattle Out & Proud personnel will be on hand at these points to assist. Thanks for your participation and cooperation.

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Albuquerque Pride 2013

June 29, 2013

Albuquerque, NM

Albuquerque Pride

Albuquerque’s largest and longest running LGBTIQ event. Celebrating 37 years of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and queer/questioning diversity!

Albuquerque Pride is a non-profit organization dedicated to:

  • Presenting a positive image of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) community
  • Educating the general public on the issues and lives of our community
  • Providing a safe space to network, come out and explore what the New Mexico GLBT community is all about
  • Building support among our allies and creating a dynamic economic, political and vocal community for all issues of social justice and freedom

ABQ Pride is a member the International Pride Coordinator’s Association (Interpride), the Consolidated Association of Pride Coordinators (CAPI),  the Albuquerque Convention and Visitors Bureau (ACVB) and The Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce (COC).

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NEWS: Petition to Apple and Google To Pull ‘Gay Cure’ App Reaches 26,000

An app that offers users to cure their gayness, is currently available to download from the Apple and Google Android stores.

by Newsdesk | 30th May 2013

AllOut.org have published a petition which calls for the iPhone maker Apple and Google's Android store to pull the smart-phone app. The petition has already garnered over 26,000 signatures.

A statement from the AllOut website reads,

'Gay 'cures'? There shouldn't be an app for that. But, there's a new one called "Setting Captives Free," available in both the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores, meant to teach you how to stop being gay.

It's a 60-day course that tells gay people they are not "born this way" and offers to help them find "freedom from the bondage of homosexuality."

These so-called treatments can cause terrible harm to lesbian, gay, bi, and trans people, or anyone forced to try to change who they are or who they love.

Apple and Google have policies against these kinds of apps but so far this one has escaped their notice. Sign now to tell them to drop this and all other gay 'cure' apps!'

Sign the petition now

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PRIDE: Oxford Pride Kicks Off Pride Week

Oxford Pride is readying to kick off it's Pride week with its launch on the 31st May.

by Newsdesk | 30th May 2013

Oxford Pride

The Pride which celebrates its tenth year, is kicking off its Pride week with a launch party at the Boiler Room Gallery, Jam Factory, 27 Park End Street OX1 1HU - Featuring speeches & entertainment including an interactive performance by Stavroula Kounadea

Then later on there is the after party at The Plush Lounge, 27 Park End Street OX1 1HU - Sponsored by Plush. Open to the public from 10.00pm to late.

In March 2013 Oxford Pride received registered charity status.

NOT THERE YET

Oxford Pride's theme for Pride 2013 is “Not There Yet”, examining that whilst we have come a long way in recent years in terms of LGBT rights, we still have a way to go to achieve full equality.

Globally, there are over seventy countries that outlaw homosexuality, and far more where same-sex marriages are not permitted, whether labelled as ‘marriage’ or otherwise. Despite the fact that homosexuality is punishable by the death penalty in Uganda, LGBT Ugandans held their first Pride

Parade last year with nearly a hundred risking their lives and turning ut for the festivities.

Whilst we in the UK don’t have to fear legal repercussions for our orientation or gender identities like many in other countries do, we still have a way to go to achieve full equality, and the ability to live free from discrimination.

OXFORD PRIDE is a 10-day arts and cultural festival from Friday 31 May to Sunday 9 June. You are invited to join in the celebration of lesbian, gay, bi, trans and queer life in Oxfordshire.

NEWS: UK Government Delay Gay Marriage Vote

A vote due to take place on Monday 3rd June to legalise same-sex marriage in the UK has been delayed by a day.

By Newsdesk | 30th May 2013

The bill, which is to be voted upon in the Lords will now take place on Tuesday 4th June 2013 in the daytime after ‘supporters warned voting in the early hours could put the bill at risk’ reports Pinknews.co.uk

Around 80 peers are due to debate the bill which raised concerns that the vote could have been delayed until 2.00AM.

Speaking to Huffington Post, shadow equalities minister Baroness Thornton said, ‘significant number of peers who wanted to support the bill would not be “strong enough to stay until 3am in the morning”.

The bill was debated and voted upon in the House of Commons and must be voted on in the House of Lords in order to become law.

HISTORY: Manchester Canal Street

Manchester Gay Village has a long history that makes it truly vintage. Starting as an underground scene in the sixties, through the decades it has transformed to what it is today: one of the most vibrant gay scenes in the UK. In this article we’ll cover the significant events that led to this transformation, describe the Village today and briefly contemplate it’s future.

by Antony Simpson | 30th May 2013

Canal Street

In the 60s the area that would become the Village was deserted following the collapse of the cotton industry. Having been industrialised it was a gloomy part of the city with little life. The night visitors to the area were either men looking for prostitutes or the prostitutes themselves.

At this point it was still illegal for men to have sex with men, gay people were isolated, not seen as part of society and often encouraged to conform and get married to someone of the opposite sex.

The New Union

The New Union pub started out as a place for men to meet female prostitutes, but it soon started to attract a small number of gay men. Female prostitutes and gay men might sound like an odd combination, but it was a relationship of mutual legal protection. If the Police ever raided, the prostitutes would pretend to be the gay men’s girlfriends so that neither could be arrested for their respective crimes: prostitution or men that are having sex with men.

In 1967 after campaigning in Manchester, London and other cities the law was changed so that men having sex with men were no longer doing anything illegal, but societal attitudes would take longer to change.

In the 70s the civil rights movement in Manchester continued to campaign for equality. The Rembrandt pub opened as well as one or two others; but these few venues were regularly raided by the police aiming to catch gay men engaging in sexual activity in a public places. The police applied the law unfairly, as it was only applied to gay men and often the attitudes of police officers were perceived as homophobic.

Then the early 80s came and along with it HIV/AIDS. This caused an increase in homophobia in society but caused the gay community to stand together. In the Village the Thompson Arms seemed to have opened at around this time, if not slightly earlier.

By the late 80s more gay people were coming out. In Manchester protests against Section 28 took place that passed through the city centre, the Village and ended at the town hall. At one of these Manchester protests around 20,000 people marched and what was significant was that: they weren’t all gay. In the Village New York, New York, Queen Club (now Company Bar) and Napoleons opened at around this time. The New Union and Rembrandt were still going strong.

In the late 80s Manchester Pride was also born, although it wasn’t named as that until many years later. It started with the owners of Rembrandt, Napoleons and the New Union wanting to do something on the August Bank Holiday weekend, the main event in the first year was an afternoon bring and buy sale. The vigil aspect came a few years later, when the gay people of Manchester started loosing their friends, lovers and life partners to HIV/AIDS.

The 90s brought a glass-fronted revolution started by the newly opened Manto bar. Before Manto the Village had a very “behind closed doors” feel to it, and this glass-fronted venue was symbolic of being: out and proud. New bars sprang up including Metz, Prague 5 (now G-A-Y), Vanilla and Via Fossa. Poptastic and Cruz 101 clubs opened around this time as well.

The late 90s brought Queer As Folk, a TV programme that dramatised life of three gay men in the Village. It was aired on Channel 4 and signified that there had been a major shift in societal attitudes towards gay people.

By the noughties the Village was similar to as it is now but the construction of The Beacon of Hope was significant. The Beacon of Hope stands on the edge of the canal in Sackville Park. It is a beautiful artistic steal structure that lights up in the evening symbolic of remembrance. Although we’ve moved on, we’ve not forgotten our gay brothers and sisters who’ve been lost to HIV/AIDS.

The Village today is a clean and bright setting with plenty of bars and clubs that gives it a vibrant atmosphere. It has the Village Business Association (business owners group), the Lesbian and Gay Foundation (a charity aimed at improving the health & well being of gay people), Manchester Pride (one of the biggest pride events in the country) and a myriad of community groups around every sort of leisure activity you could imagine. If you want to find out more about Manchester Gay Village, see our guide to gay Manchester:

http://www.thegayuk.com/manchester

Looking at the Village’s history one thing that is clear: it has always brought the gay community of Manchester together. Once together gay people have always instigated the change they want to happen. As long as the Village continues to bring the gay community together, be a part of the changes and keep up with them, it’s future will remain secure.

Antony Simpson, writer of this article wasn’t born until the mid-eighties. So in addition to speaking to some of his older friends who witnessed to some of the historic events in this article, he would also like to reference the following sources:

Gaydio: Your Story Radio Documentary, available: http://yourstory.gaydio.co.uk/documentaries/

Guardian: Village people by Beatrix Campbell, available:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2004/aug/07/gayrights.communities

Channel 4 OD: Queer As Folk

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/queer-as-folk/4od

Wikipedia: Canal Street (Manchester), available:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canal_Street_(Manchester)

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St. Pete Pride 2013

June 26, 2013toJune 30, 2013

St. Petersburg, FL

St. Pete Pride

The purpose of St. Pete Pride is to promote unity, visibility, self-esteem and a positive image of and among the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community of Tampa Bay and throughout the State of Florida by way of cultural and educational programs and activities.

The Promenade, held along Central Avenue between 21st Street and 29th Street, features more than 100 organizations and businesses supporting and celebrating the Tampa Bay LGBT community. The Promenade and Street Festival together draw more than 100,000 attendees, making it one of Tampa Bay’s largest events!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 10 AM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St

The Street Festival, now in its 11th year, is Tampa Bay’s annual LGBT street fair that combines vendors, entertainers and activities for a day of fun and celebration in the name of equality. The Street Festival and Promenade combined attracts thousands of out-of-state visitors and brings them together with local residents and families, corporate sponsors, community leaders and area business owners.

The Street Festival is the perfect place to stop to listen to a few tunes, grab a bite to eat or score some great Pride gear. And the best part is, it’s totally FREE!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 9 AM to 4 PM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St.

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St. Pete Pride 2013

June 26, 2013toJune 30, 2013

St. Petersburg, FL

St. Pete Pride

The purpose of St. Pete Pride is to promote unity, visibility, self-esteem and a positive image of and among the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community of Tampa Bay and throughout the State of Florida by way of cultural and educational programs and activities.

The Promenade, held along Central Avenue between 21st Street and 29th Street, features more than 100 organizations and businesses supporting and celebrating the Tampa Bay LGBT community. The Promenade and Street Festival together draw more than 100,000 attendees, making it one of Tampa Bay’s largest events!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 10 AM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St

The Street Festival, now in its 11th year, is Tampa Bay’s annual LGBT street fair that combines vendors, entertainers and activities for a day of fun and celebration in the name of equality. The Street Festival and Promenade combined attracts thousands of out-of-state visitors and brings them together with local residents and families, corporate sponsors, community leaders and area business owners.

The Street Festival is the perfect place to stop to listen to a few tunes, grab a bite to eat or score some great Pride gear. And the best part is, it’s totally FREE!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 9 AM to 4 PM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St.

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St. Pete Pride 2013

June 26, 2013toJune 30, 2013

St. Petersburg, FL

St. Pete Pride

The purpose of St. Pete Pride is to promote unity, visibility, self-esteem and a positive image of and among the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community of Tampa Bay and throughout the State of Florida by way of cultural and educational programs and activities.

The Promenade, held along Central Avenue between 21st Street and 29th Street, features more than 100 organizations and businesses supporting and celebrating the Tampa Bay LGBT community. The Promenade and Street Festival together draw more than 100,000 attendees, making it one of Tampa Bay’s largest events!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 10 AM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St

The Street Festival, now in its 11th year, is Tampa Bay’s annual LGBT street fair that combines vendors, entertainers and activities for a day of fun and celebration in the name of equality. The Street Festival and Promenade combined attracts thousands of out-of-state visitors and brings them together with local residents and families, corporate sponsors, community leaders and area business owners.

The Street Festival is the perfect place to stop to listen to a few tunes, grab a bite to eat or score some great Pride gear. And the best part is, it’s totally FREE!

Date: Saturday, June 29, 2013

Time: 9 AM to 4 PM

Location: Grand Central District, along Central Avenue between 21st St and 29th St.

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